Tuesday, 1 January 2013

2012's Finest: CHVRCHES

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Happy New Year! 2012 is officially over, and with it our collection of Best Of lists. But I have trouble letting go and so, over the next few days, I'm going to be writing something a bit more focused in each of the media I covered before - games, films, comics, and, starting right now, music. Enjoy.

CHVRCHES

Some bands just have the perfect name, y’know?

The Knife. Crystal Castles. Ladytron. Robyn. These names are statements of intent – deep cuts; dark cocaine fantasyland; the beat of an androgynous titanium breast; popstars don’t have surnames, etc – and the very best of them could just be copied and pasted over and over, to the length of a full review.

Not coincidentally, these bands are also some of my go-to touchpoints for describing Chvrches.
Chvrches. (or more properly: CHVRCHES, which is even better but totally exhausting to type.) They were previously named Churches – which is much less perfect – until they realised that Google needn’t be their enemy, they dropped the U for a sharp Romanesque V.

As Alan Moore, Dan Brown and the cast of Sesame Street will tell you, there’s a certain magic about the letter V. It’s a great visual, echoed in The Mother We Share's cover art, endlessly repeatable and suggestive. There’s a hint at that most dog-eared of music journo descriptors,‘cathedrals of sound’, and at something a bit eldritch. The surgical removal of a soft, organic vowel sound, replaced with crystal-clear enunciation. The way it turns the word into something familiar, altered…

Seven letters. Am I reaching a bit?



Of course I am. There’s something perfectly-formed about Chvrches which repels my attempts at analysis. I have listened to these two songs – The Mother We Share and Lies – on endless repeat since I found the mp3s. But each time I try to probe further, I just surface with handfuls of cliché, like silt between my fingers.
Statement of intent. Sharp. Crisp. Cold. Icy – but no, that’s not right. Laser-tight. Beamed. Warped. Alternate Universe Pop.

When I try and talk about them, I keep reaching for tactile words. I think that’s telling. The best synths have a hallmark texture, and listening to this thin selection of songs over and over feels like exploring that surface, like running your fingers over old wallpaper, like they were designed to be made into Audiosurf levels.



So let's explore a little: Lies, 2:25–2:45. It starts with an echoing "anyoneanyoneanyone", then suddenly the crunching synths - which have until this point supported the song's weight - drop out to make way for another echo: ohohohohohoh. It's a smooth stone skimming along a fluid surface, which is left to just hang there for a moment. Then it's given an electronic tweak. The sound starts to multiply and mutate, getting layered over itself, another anyoneanyoneanyone dropped on top of it... and then the stompy bit drops back in, like a godsent L-shaped Tetris piece at just the right moment. Delicious.

Because of that reliance of the synths to build the songs, it's hard to read the sonics as anything but cold and mechanical, especially given the way they squash and squeeze Lauren Mayberry's wonderful vocals. But the way I respond to these songs is anything but inorganic - as I type this, I'm dancing at the laptop, thrusting my hands into the air at each climax, singing the nearest approximations of the words I can manage.

At their best, Chvrches are capable of what I think of as 'the Arcade Fire Moment' – songs that can flood into you, through your mouth and eyes and ears and into your heart and lungs. Songs like that have been few and far between of late for me, so it’s something I treasure.


I want to say the songs are built around a basic emotional core, as simple as the Beach Boys, but I couldn't begin to tell you what any they're about. Well, I can: they’re about looping endlessly on the biggest headphones you’ve got, and looking up to one of those perfectly clear London skies and thinking this is it, all transcendental and that... Just not, like, what the words are actually about.

But since when has that mattered round here?



(And just in case you're as addicted as I am, here is pretty much everything else they've put out. For all my brow-furrowing over that V earlier, it's worth noting the playfulness of retitling their Prince cover to I Would Die for V)

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Videogames, film, music, comics: feed them into the Alex-Spencer machine and out come neat little articles. Like the ones you're looking at here.